2021 08 07T054441Z 260534505 SP1EH870FYB4U RTRMADP 3 OLYMPICS 2020 GLF W STROKE MEDAL

The Ladies Professional Golf Association is not unknown to anyone involved in the world of golf. The American organization for female golfers is heading toward its Tour’s finale and the race is getting more intense by the day.

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The depth of competition has grown in the Tour in recent years. More young talent has been attracted to the sport in the last few decades. As per recent news, the player’s time is not going to get any easier in the coming days.

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LPGA players on the edge for entry in the tour’s finale

As is well known, the LPGA Tour is heading toward its tour’s finale. The run for getting entry to the major league’s prestigious finale is now getting more and more competitive.

The criteria for entering the Tour’s finale is not the easiest, and rightly so. The players have to reach the top 60 in order to qualify for the same.

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Sep 3, 2021; Toledo, Ohio, USA; Jessica Korda of Team USA tees off on the first hole during the final practice round of the 2021 Solheim Cup at Inverness Club. Mandatory Credit: Raj Mehta-USA TODAY Sports

As per recent news, the players have only two more chances to qualify for the LPGA’s Toto Japan Classic, set for Nov. 3-6 at Seta Golf Course in Shiga. Ariya Jutanugarn is one player who recently made the cut. Anna Nordqvist and Stacy Lewis have also qualified, as of now.

Some players like Matilda Castren, Brittany Altomare, Angel Yin, and Yealimi Noh, are on the edge and have a cut-through fight when it comes to this major opportunity.

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All in all, as the competition on the LPGA Tour, has grown, the game has become way more interesting. The upcoming two events of the LPGA Tour season will decide a lot for these players. It is a sight to see such talent from around the world competing for a huge sum of prize money while being on the edge.

LPGA Tour player Lydia Ko struggle with fat shaming

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Lydia Ko and her determination to the game of golf is probably an inspiration to people of all age groups. The talented pro golfer’s rise to world no. 1 at just 17 is definitely something that gives hope to the younger generation about the significance of hard work in achieving success.

However, life has not always been all too easy for Ko. She has, for one, faced her share of battles and surmounted them with finesse. The pro golfer lost around 15 pounds in 2018 by following a cardio regimen.

She was not far behind in sharing how she felt post the transformation. She said, “I don’t feel bloated, which I think is a huge thing. I’m trying to gain more muscle and lose a bit of the unnecessary fat. Everybody seems like they are hitting it longer and longer.”

2021 08 07T053239Z 1421285605 SP1EH870FEB2Z RTRMADP 3 OLYMPICS 2020 GLF W STROKE MEDAL
Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Golf – Women’s Individual – Medal Ceremony – Kasumigaseki Country Club – Kawagoe, Saitama, Japan – August 7, 2021. Bronze medalist Lydia Ko of New Zealand holds flowers. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

Although, not everyone reacted optimistically to this news. Juli Inkster, a seven-time major winner, and an ex-Golf Channel commentator had other opinions. During an interview, she said, “Looks like she needs to go to the buffet counter a little bit.” To this, Golf Channel analyst Judy Rankin replied“We all want to see five more pounds on Lydia.”

This was heavily objected to by fans only. Inkster responded to the heavy criticism. She said, “I kid her all the time…don’t take things so seriously. We are a family out here. We care for each other.”

However, this response was not widely accepted and questions were raised on both the tour and the people who made the statement.

What do you think about Lydia Ko’s routine? Share your views in the comments section below.

Watch this story: Veteran LPGA golfer explains why the women’s game is struggling



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